Sunday Note: What is the Kingdom of God Like?

Text

Mark 4:26-34

He also said, “This is what the kingdom of God is like. A man scatters seed on the ground. Night and day, whether he sleeps or gets up, the seed sprouts and grows, though he does not know how. All by itself the soil produces grain—first the stalk, then the head, then the full kernel in the head. As soon as the grain is ripe, he puts the sickle to it, because the harvest has come.”

Again he said, “What shall we say the kingdom of God is like, or what parable shall we use to describe it? It is like a mustard seed, which is the smallest of all seeds on earth. Yet when planted, it grows and becomes the largest of all garden plants, with such big branches that the birds can perch in its shade.”

With many similar parables Jesus spoke the word to them, as much as they could understand. He did not say anything to them without using a parable. But when he was alone with his own disciples, he explained everything.

 

Note

Jesus spoke more about the kingdom of God than about anything else. Often this gets confused with more modern concepts of “heaven.” But this “kingdom” was never about the afterlife. In the words of NT Wright, noted New Testament scholar, “It is about the establishment of the rule of heaven, in others words, the rule of God here on earth.” In my words, it’s about the way of God, the way of heaven here on earth. It’s about relationships, families, communities, policies, economies, governments, borders, individual hearts and global relations mirroring God’s way, God’s character, God’s very being. And that begins on earth and extends into eternity—in New-Testament-speak, it begins in this age and extends into the age to come.

It is a new social ordering that mirrors the way of God from the bottom-up, individual to communal, grassroots to highest office. Where the least are first; where the hungry are fed; where the thirsty find drink; where the naked are clothed; where prisoners are set free; where the oppressed are unchained; where the poor are given good news. It is the Kin-dom of God, the Commonwealth of God, the Economy of God.

Jesus asks, “What shall we say the kingdom of God is like?” To what can this Commonwealth, Kin-dom of God be compared that we already have, that we already can experience?

It is like a man scattering seed on the ground. Night and day, whether he sleeps or gets up, the seed sprouts and grows, though he does not know how. All by itself the soil produces grain—first the stalk, then the head, then the full kernel in the head. As soon as the grain is ripe, he puts the sickle to it, because the harvest has come.

It is like a mustard seed, which is the smallest of all seeds on earth. Yet when planted, it grows and becomes the largest of all garden plants, with such big branches that the birds can perch in its shade.


The kingdom of God is naturally, organically growing under our noses.Planted and wanted (as grain) or unwanted and invasive (as mustard plants) God’s kingdom is here and growing. Will we take notice? Will we reap the harvest of what God is doing in the world? Will we find shade and rest and a home in it like the birds?

It is much easier to see the places where the kingdom of God is pushed back, where this harvest is being burned, where this mustard plant is being cut down. It is easy to see where our relationships, families, communities, and inner turmoil are not mirroring the way of God, shown through Jesus. It is easy—sometimes too easy—to see where our policies, economies, and governments are not mirroring God’s commonwealth.

The Kingdom of God is both something intentionally seeded and an invasive species. In barren places, we are called to plant the seeds again and again then wait for the harvest. And even as we wait and rest and wonder if the planting make any difference at all—God is at work growing the harvest.

And we are called to pay attention, to notice when God’s Kingdom is sprouting in unwelcomed places. In the midst of all that is un-Christ-like, Jesus invites us to take notice of the invasive species of God’s Kingdom. And maybe throw some extra water and light on it.

Plant, cultivate, and notice the Christ-like—in yourself, in your closest community, and in our larger systems. Do not only kick back darkness or rage against injustice-- Create and lean into the light, the good, the beautiful, the just. And rest **do not miss this** rest, be at peace, perch in the shade in kingdom places. Because it is God that makes the kingdom grow, and it is God who will bring it to fruition. Where you are--saint and sinner--and where the world is--kingdom of God and kingdom of tyrants--God is present and at work.

So, what shall you say the kingdom of God is like?